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Corona-Crisis

Berlin Guidance for Temporary Cycle Lanes and Expansion of Cycle Facilities

Berliner Regelpläne zur temporären Einrichtung und Erweiterung von Radverkehrsanlagen
Berliner Regelpläne zur temporären Einrichtung und Erweiterung von Radverkehrsanlagen © Senatsverwaltung für Umwelt, Verkehr und Klimaschutz (SenUVK)

Berlin Guidance for Temporary Cycle Lanes and Expansion of Cycle Facilities

The Berlin Department for Environment, Transport, and Climate Protection published a collection of guidance images in April 2020 for the creation of temporary cycle facilities during lockdown caused by the COVID-19 Pandemic. Most countries have created lockdown situations where people should only travel with good reason, the UK has also adopted this approach with clarity that good reason includes exercising which can be cycling.

Key workers still need to commute to their places of work or travel about within and between towns and cities. Although public transport is still running in many cities, it is at much reduced capacity due to staff sickness and need for social distancing between passengers as well as staff. Increased use of motor vehicles will likely be an undesirable method for the majority of key workers to travel, as early evidence is linking air pollution as a factor in high mortality rates from respiratory illnesses as well as a potential vector for the virus. Furthermore, there is a need to reduce hospitalisations from traffic related collisions.

Several cities worldwide have started filtering residential streets so motor traffic cannot pass through, or speeding up cycle network plans by introducing quick temporary measures to mark out and protect cycleways on streets.

Berlin is one of those cities and has produced a short guidance document to help designers and contractors consistently implement the measures. Since many local authorities in the UK have started considering, and some started taking action, to install temporary cycle facilities we thought it would be helpfulto translate the Berlin document. The translation is both a language and a regulatory translation, so for each of the guidance images we have produced a series of notes to help explain how to interpret the Berlin guidance as well as how it links with current UK design guidance.

Meta Infos
Date
10. April 2020
Further information
Source
Alistair McCay: Infrastructure and Environment, University of Glasgow. Catriona Swanson: Senior Planner, Arup. Michael Barratt: Transport for London. Steve Essex: Transport Planner, Transport Initiatives. Neil Ferguson, Civil and Environmental Engineering, University of Strathclyde.
Region
Berlin
NRVP Action Area
Topics
Keywords